Puzzle Genius

Hundred is a numerical puzzle that involves strategically placing digits in a grid to achieve specific sums in each row and column. The puzzle is played on a 3x3 or 4x4 grid. Here’s an example Hundred puzzle:

An example of a Hundred puzzle

As you can see, the cells are already filled with digits. Your task is to add extra digits into some or all cells in such a way the the sum of the numbers in each row and each column equals 100.

You can add digits before or after those already in a cell. So for example a 7 could become 17 by adding 1 in front of it, or 71 by putting the 1 after it.

There are no restrictions on how often you can use digits, and all the digits from 0 to 9 are on the table.

Here’s what the example puzzle looks like once it’s been solved:

The solution to the example Hundred puzzle.

Eulero, also known as a Graeco-Latin Square or Euler Square, is a fascinating logic puzzle that combines elements of Latin squares and Sudoku. Here’s what a small puzzle looks like:

An example of a Eulero puzzle grid.

The puzzle is played on a square grid. Bigger grids mean harder puzzles. Each cell in the grid must contain one letter and one digit. Normally, the letters and digits corresponds to the size of the grid. So in a 5x5 grid, we use use the letters A to E and the digits 1 to 5.

The objective of Eulero is to fill out the grid such that every row and every column contains each letter and each digit exactly once - ie no row or column can have a repeated letter or digit. Additionally, no two cells in the grid can contain the same pairing of a letter and a digit.

Here’s what our example puzzle looks like when complete:

The solution to the example Eulero puzzle.

Tips for Solving Eulero

Start with Known Pairs. Some cells are already filled in, or are partially filled in (depending on the difficulty level of the puzzle), so use them as a starting point. The given pairs can help you determine what can't be in the same row or column.

Elimination.  If you're unsure about where a particular symbol should go, consider where it can't go. This process of elimination can narrow down your options.

Sudoku. Eulero follows similar rules to Sudoku, which means that many Sudoku techniques can either be used directly, or adapted, to help solve the puzzle. See our detailed three-part Sudoku tutorial here for some ideas.

Where to Play

Fancy filling some thermometers? We publish this puzzle occasionally in our free Puzzle Weekly magazine. You should totally sign up for that if you haven’t already, as it puts 28 brand new puzzles in your inbox every week.

You can also find lots of Thermometers puzzles in our Jumbo Adult Puzzle Book – which happens to include more than 500 puzzles of 20 different varieties.

Stitches is an intriguing logic puzzle that involves connecting different regions of a grid with lines. This is what a small grid looks like:

Stitches logic puzzle e
xample

The puzzle is played on a square grid divided into variously shaped regions. Each region must be connected to every one of its neighbouring regions by exactly one line. These lines are referred to as "stitches."

A stitch is a line that spans one cell, connecting two orthogonally adjacent cells from different regions.

A cell can be traversed by at most one stitch.

Numbers along the edge of the grid indicate how many line endpoints must be placed in the corresponding row or column.

Here is what the above example looks like once it’s been completed:

Solution to the example Stitches logic puzzle

Tips for Solving Stitches

Start with Edge Clues. Look at the rows and columns with numbers on the grid's edge. This tells you how many times a stitch must end in that row or column, guiding where to draw your initial stitches.

Use the Single Cell Rule. Since a cell can only have one stitch, if a stitch already passes through a cell, you can’t draw another stitch through that cell.

Check for Isolated Regions. Be wary of creating isolated regions where a region cannot possibly connect to a neighbour because all potential connecting cells are used up.

Consider Stitch Length. Stitches only extend one cell. This limits the possible connections, especially near the grid's edges or in tightly packed areas.

Balance Edge Requirements. Continuously cross-check the stitches with the edge numbers. Each row and column should have the exact number of endpoints as indicated by the clues.

Stitches is a great puzzle for those who enjoy spatial reasoning and planning. The challenge lies in ensuring all regions are properly connected while adhering to the grid's constraints. 

Where to Play

Fancy filling some thermometers? We publish this puzzle occasionally in our free Puzzle Weekly magazine. You should totally sign up for that if you haven’t already, as it puts 28 brand new puzzles in your inbox every week.

You can also find lots of Thermometers puzzles in our Jumbo Adult Puzzle Book – which happens to include more than 500 puzzles of 20 different varieties.

Thermometers is a pure logic puzzle played on a square or rectangular grid filled with thermometer shapes. Each thermometer has a base (the bulbous end) and a top. In simple puzzles, thermometers may be placed horizontally and / or vertically. In more difficult levels, the thermometers may be ‘broken’ such that they span more than one column or row.

The objective of the game is to fill the thermometers sufficiently that the number of cells filled in a row and column of the grid corresponds to the numbers on the outside of the grid.

Here’s a small example Thermometers puzzle:

A small example of a thermometers puzzle.

Rules

  • Thermometers can be entirely unfilled, partially filled, or completely filled.
  • Thermometer always fill from the base toward the top. This is irrespective of the thermometer's actual orientation on the grid.
  • Each filled segment of a thermometer counts as one filled cell.

Here is what the example puzzle looks like when it has been solved:

The solution to the thermometers example puzzle.

Tips for Solving Thermometers

Start with Extremes. Look for rows or columns with a 0 written outside. This means no cell in that row or column is filled, so all thermometers crossing it remain unfilled beyond that cell. Similarly, if a row or column's clue equals its length (e.g., a clue of '5' for a row of 5 cells), then every cell in that row or column is filled.

Look for Forced Fills. If a thermometer segment in a row or column is filled, then all segments below it (toward the base) must also be filled. Conversely, if a segment is unfilled, all segments above it (toward the top) must be unfilled too.

 Use Partial Information. Even if you can't completely determine the fill status of a row, column, or thermometer, partial fills can help. For instance, if you have a row of 8 cells with a clue of '6', and two thermometers with bases in that row, you know at least some segments of those thermometers must be filled to meet the clue.

Mind the Gaps. If filling a thermometer segment would exceed the clue number for a row or column, then that segment (and those above it) must remain unfilled.

Use Pencil Marks. For cells you’re not sure about, mark potential fills lightly. If they lead to contradictions, you can erase and reassess.

Where to Play

Fancy filling some thermometers? We publish this puzzle occasionally in our free Puzzle Weekly magazine. You should totally sign up for that if you haven’t already, as it puts 28 brand new puzzles in your inbox every week.

You can also find lots of Thermometers puzzles in our Jumbo Adult Puzzle Book – which happens to include more than 500 puzzles of 20 different varieties.

Star Battle is a pure logic puzzle that takes seconds to learn, but can become surprisingly tricky as the difficulty level increases.

The puzzle is played on a square grid which is divided into various regions, delimited by bold lines.

Here is an example of a Star Battle grid:

An example Star Battle grid

The objective of the puzzle is to place stars into the cells such that every row, column, and grid contains exactly the same number of stars. Stars cannot be placed in adjacent cells (ie stars cannot be in cells that touch horizontally, vertically, or diagonally). Every region must contain one star when the puzzle is complete.

Here’s what the earlier example grid looks like once it’s been solved:

The solution to the example star battle grid.

Tips for Solving Star Battle:

Start with Smallest Regions. If a region is particularly small or has a unique shape, it might have limited options for star placements. Begin there.

Mark Forbidden Cells. Once you place a star, mark all adjacent cells as forbidden for star placement. This will help you visualise where stars can't go, which often reveals where they should go. You can use a dot, a small x, or shade these cells lightly to indicate they're off-limits for stars.

Use Pencil Marks. If you're unsure about a star's placement, mark it lightly or use a different symbol. If it doesn't lead to any contradictions, it might be a valid placement.

Look for Forced Moves. Sometimes, the configuration of a region or the placement of stars nearby will force a star into a specific cell. Look out for these as they can give quick progress.

Where to Play

Want to try your hand at Star Battle? We sometimes include this puzzle in our free Puzzle Weekly magazine – you should totally sign up for that if you haven’t already, as it puts 28 brand new puzzles in your inbox every week.
You can also find four levels of the puzzle in our Jumbo Adult Puzzle Book – which happens to include more than 500 puzzles of 20 different varieties.

Tetromino is a logic puzzle that originated in Japan. The puzzle consists of a rectangular or square grid with symbols in some of its cells. The symbols can be triangles, diamonds, squares, or circles.

The objective of the puzzle is to divide the grid into regions, each comprising exactly four cells – known as tetrominoes – and each containing two symbols. And yes, tetrominoes are the same shapes you find in Tetris! For reference, here are the possible tetromino shapes:

Examples of tetromino shapes

These are just the basic shapes – tetrominoes can be flipped and / or mirrored, giving more possibilities.

Here’s what a simple Tetromino grid looks like:

An example of a small Tetromino grid

Rules of Tetromino

  • Each tetromino must contain exactly two different symbols.
  • Tetrominoes of the same shape must all contain the same two symbols, though not necessarily in the same positions.
  • Tetrominoes can be flipped, rotated or mirrored – they still count as the same shape whatever their orientation.
  • When the puzzle is complete, every cell must be part of a tetromino, no cell can be left orphaned.

Here is the what the above example puzzle looks like once it’s been solved by drawing in the tetromino regions:

The completed example Tetromino puzzle

Tips for Solving Tetromino

Work from the edges. Starting from the edges can be beneficial because there are fewer possibilities for tetromino placements. Once the edges are filled, it can make the inner sections easier to tackle.

Start with known shapes. Look for cells that already have symbols and try to form tetrominoes around them. Remember, each tetromino must have two different symbols.

Rotation and mirroring. Tetrominoes can be rotated or mirrored. This means that the same shape can appear in different orientations throughout the grid.

Avoid isolating symbols. As you form tetrominoes, ensure that you don't isolate any symbols. Every symbol should be part of a tetromino.

Try using colour. Some people find that colouring in the symbols can help them solve the puzzle more easily. That’s because some brains are wired to see colour differentials more prominently than shape differentials. Some people consider this cheating. We believe it’s a personal choice, so all of our Tetromino puzzles use unfilled symbols so that you have the option of colouring them.

Check for consistency. As you progress, regularly check to ensure that tetrominoes of the same shape have the same symbols. Adjust as necessary.

Use deduction. If you're stuck, try to deduce where symbols might go based on the remaining empty cells and the requirement for each tetromino to have two different symbols.

Use elimination. If you're unsure about a particular placement, consider all possible tetromino shapes that could fit in that space. By eliminating the ones that don't meet the symbol criteria, you can narrow down your options.

Look for unique symbols. If a particular symbol appears less frequently on the grid, focus on it. Since each tetromino must contain two different symbols, this can guide your placements.

Avoid creating un-fillable spaces. As you place tetrominoes, be cautious not to create spaces that can't be filled with a tetromino. If you notice such a space, backtrack and adjust your previous placements.

Sketch out possibilities. If you're solving on paper, lightly sketch out potential tetromino shapes before committing. This allows you to visualise placements without making permanent marks.

Stay flexible. Don't get too attached to a particular placement. If you find that a section isn't working out, be willing to erase or adjust your placements. Sometimes, a fresh perspective can help you see new possibilities.

Break down larger grids. For larger puzzles, it can be beneficial to break the grid down into smaller sections. Solve each section individually, then work to connect them together.

Like all puzzles, the more you practice, the better you'll become at spotting patterns and solving Tetromino puzzles more quickly. Practice with different difficulties. Start with simpler puzzles to get a feel for the game mechanics. As you become more confident, challenge yourself with more complex grids.

Where to Play

Want to try your hand at Tetromino? We have the perfect book for you! Tetromino: Volume 1 contains 100 puzzles over five levels of difficulty. We sometimes also feature this puzzle in our free Puzzle Weekly magazine – you should totally sign up for that if you haven’t already, as it puts 28 brand new puzzles in your inbox every week.

No Four in a Row is played on a square grid, which can vary in size according to the level of difficulty. Some of the cells in the grid are filled with either Xs or Os. The objective of the puzzle is to fill in the rest of the grid with more Xs and Os such that there are never four (or more) of the same symbol appearing consecutively either horizontally, vertically, or diagonally.

Here is an example of a small grid:

No Four in a Row example grid

Here is what the example puzzle looks like once it has been solved:

The solution to the example No Four in a Row puzzle

Tips for Solving No Four in a Row

Start with given symbols. Consider the rows and columns the pre-filled symbols are in, and ensure that placing symbols around them won’t immediately violate the "no four in a row" rule.

Look for safe plays. Initially, try to place symbols in positions where it’s impossible to form four in a row due to the grid's boundaries.

Blocking. Sometimes, it’s beneficial to place a symbol simply to prevent a row of three (which would necessitate a block to prevent a row of four on the next turn).

Mind the diagonals. Diagonal lines can be tricky. Keep a close eye on the longer diagonals of the grid to make sure you’re not accidentally forming a line of four.

Adjustments. Be ready to reassess and retrace your steps if you find yourself in a position where you’re forced to place four symbols in a row.

Consider future moves. When placing a symbol, consider how it will impact future moves, especially in the surrounding rows, columns, and diagonals.

The more you play, the more you'll begin to notice patterns and strategies that work, making it easier to navigate through trickier puzzles.

Where to Play

Want to try your hand at No Four in a Row? We sometimes include them in our free Puzzle Weekly magazine – you should totally sign up for that if you haven’t already, as it puts 28 brand new puzzles in your inbox every week.

You can also find four levels of the puzzle in our Jumbo Adult Puzzle Book – which happens to include more than 500 puzzles of 20 different varieties.

Puzzle Weekly has been designed to look great on a wide variety of devices. As well as the printable section, the magazine includes all the puzzles in large format ready to be completed directly on your device.

The instructions on this page will help you load the magazine onto a variety of popular devices.

Jump to:

iPad

The easiest way to get the magazine on your iPad is simply to open it from within your email. From whatever email app you are using (the built-in one, or any third party app like Gmail), tap on the Puzzle Weekly PDF attachment. The magazine will open right up for you.

We highly recommend saving the attachment to the Books app before starting to fill out the puzzles. This way everything you do will be saved in the file.

To save the attachment, with the magazine open, tap the share icon - it looks like this: ios share icon

If you can’t see the share icon, you might need to tap the screen to show the controls in your app.

From the pop-up menu, tap the Books app icon. If you can’t see it in the list, scroll horizontally to the end of the list, click the “…More” icon, and then select Books from the list.

If you are using a more recent version of iPadOS, you may see a “Open in Books” option right at the top of the screen, which you can use instead.

When reading the magazine in the Books app, you can tap the pen icon at the top of the screen to start solving the puzzles on your iPad.

As an alternative to the Books app, you may prefer to save the magazine to the built-in Notes app. The steps are the same, just choose Notes from the list of icons.

Further help for the iPad can be found here.

Kindle Scribe

There are a couple of ways to get your copy of Puzzle Weekly onto your Kindle Scribe, depending on whether you are using a computer or a phone.

From a Computer, Using the Send to Kindle Tool:

  • Go to Amazon's Send to Kindle page. Note that link is for Amazon.com - if your Kindle account is in another country, you’ll need to use the Send to Kindle page for that country’s store. The page is always at /sendtokindle - for example, in the uk you can navigate to amazon.co.uk/sendtokindle
  • Sign in to your Amazon account if you’re not already logged in.
  • Drag and drop the Puzzle Weekly PDF file onto the page. Make sure the ‘add to your library’ option is selected (it is on by default) then click the ‘Send’ button.
  • The magazine will automatically appear in the library tab of your Kindle Scribe. It may take a few minutes between the file uploading then downloading again to your device.

From a Phone or Tablet, Using The Mobile App:

  • Ensure you have the Kindle app installed on your smartphone or tablet.
  • Sign in to your Amazon account within the app.
  • Open the Puzzle Weekly PDF file attachment from within your mail app, then use the sharing option to “Send to” the Kindle app. It will be uploaded to your Kindle library in the cloud.
  • The magazine will automatically appear in the library tab of your Kindle Scribe.

Further help for Kindle Scribe can be found here.

Kobo Elipsa

There are a couple of ways of sending the magazine to your Kobo Elipsa.

From a computer, via a USB cable:

  1. Connect Your Kobo Elipsa to Your Computer:
  • Turn on your Kobo Elipsa eReader.
  • Connect it to your computer using a USB-C cable.
  • On your eReader, tap "Connect" when you see the "Computer Detected" popup window.
  1. Transfer the PDF:
  • On your computer, navigate to the folder named 'KOBOeReader'.
  • Drag and drop the Puzzle Weekly PDF file into this folder.
  1. Eject and Disconnect:
  • Safely eject the 'KOBOeReader' drive from your computer.
  • Unplug the USB-C cable from your eReader. You should see an "Importing Content" message on your eReader.
  1. Access the magazine:
  • Go to the home screen of your Kobo Elipsa.
  • Tap "My Books" at the bottom of the screen.
  • Tap on Puzzle Weekly magazine to start reading.

From a phone, tablet, or computer via Google Drive or Dropbox:

  1. Upload Puzzle Weekly to Google Drive or Dropbox:
  • On your computer or mobile device, open Google Drive or Dropbox.
    • Upload the Puzzle Weekly PDF.
  1. Access Google Drive or Dropbox on Kobo Elipsa:
  • On your Kobo Elipsa, open the web browser.
  1. Download the magazine:
  • Locate the PDF file you uploaded earlier.
  • Tap on the file and select the option to download. The magazine will be saved to your Kobo Elipsa's storage.
  1. Access the magazine on Kobo Elipsa:
  • Return to the home screen of your Kobo Elipsa.
  • Tap "My Books" at the bottom of the screen.
  • You should see the magazine you downloaded. Tap on it to start reading.

Further help for Kobo Elipsa can be found here.

reMarkable

To get your copy of Puzzle Weekly onto your reMarkable tablet, you can use the reMarkable app, or Google Drive or Dropbox.

From a phone, tablet, or computer via the web:

  1. Connect to the reMarkable website:
  • Go to the website my.remarkable.com
  • Follow the instructions to upload the Puzzle Weekly PDF file.
  1. Access the magazine on your reMarkable tablet.
  • On your reMarkable tablet, navigate to the "My Files" section.
  • You should see the PDF you transferred. Tap on it to open.

From a phone, tablet, or computer using the reMarkable App:

  1. Install the reMarkable App:
  • Download and install the reMarkable app on your computer or mobile device. This app acts as a bridge between your device and the reMarkable tablet.
  1. Connect Your reMarkable:
  • Ensure your reMarkable tablet is connected to Wi-Fi.
  • Open the reMarkable app on your computer or mobile device and sign in with your reMarkable account.
  1. Transfer the magazine:
  • Drag and drop the Puzzle Weekly PDF file into the reMarkable app window.
  • The file will automatically sync to your reMarkable tablet if it's connected to Wi-Fi.
  1. Access the magazine on reMarkable:
  • On your reMarkable tablet, navigate to the "My Files" section.
  • You should see the PDF you transferred. Tap on it to open.

Further help for reMarkable can be found here.

Puzzle Weekly is a multi-format magazine, incorporating a section that is specifically designed to be printed. This section fits the all the week’s puzzles (including kids puzzles) into just 7 pages optimised to minimise ink-use.

Every issue includes the page range to print in a call-out box on the Tips & Tutorials page.

The instructions on this page will guide you through how to print just the printable pages from whatever computer or device you are using.

Jump to:

Windows

When you open Puzzle Weekly it will most likely open in the default PDF reader for Windows called Microsoft Edge. We’ve also included instructions for printing from the popular Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Using Microsoft Edge:

  • Access the Print Menu:
    • With the Puzzle Weekly PDF open, click on the three horizontal dots (ellipsis) located in the top-right corner of the window.
    • From the drop-down menu, select 'Print' or just press Ctrl + P on your keyboard.
  • Specify Page Range:
    • In the print preview pane that appears, you'll see an option labeled 'Pages'. By default, it will be set to 'All'.
    • Click on the drop-down menu next to 'Pages' and select 'Custom'.
    • Enter the desired page range in the field provided. For example, to print pages 32 to 38, you'd enter 32-38.
  • Print:
    • Once you've specified your desired page range, click on the 'Print' button.

Using Adobe Acrobat Reader:

  • Access the Print Menu:
    • With the Puzzle Weekly PDF open, click on the 'File' option in the upper-left corner of the screen.
    • From the drop-down menu, select 'Print' or press Ctrl + P on your keyboard.
  • Specify Page Range:
    • In the print dialog box, you'll see an option labeled 'Pages'.
    • Select the 'Pages' radio button and then enter the desired page range in the field provided. For example, to print pages 32 to 38, you'd enter 32-38.
  • Print:
    • Confirm the printer, settings, and other preferences.
    • Click on the 'Print' button.

Tips:

  • You can preview your page range before printing to ensure you're printing the right section.
  • Make sure you have the correct printer selected, especially if you’re in an environment or workplace with multiple printers connected or virtual printers installed.
  • To save paper, consider printing double-sided if your printer supports these options.

macOS (Apple Mac)

Most of the time Puzzle Weekly will open in the default application called Preview. Adobe Acrobat Reader DC is also available for macOS, so we’ve included instructions here for both.

Using Preview:

  • Access the Print Menu:
    • With the Puzzle Weekly PDF is open in Preview, go to the top-left corner of the screen and click on 'File'.
    • From the drop-down menu, select 'Print' or simply press Command (⌘) + P on your keyboard.
  • Specify Page Range:
    • In the print dialog box, look for the section labeled 'Pages'. By default, it might be set to 'All'.
    • Select the 'From' option, and then input your desired starting and ending page numbers in the fields provided. For example, to print pages 32 to 38, you'd enter 32 in the first field and 38 in the second.
  • Print:
    • After specifying your page range and confirming other print settings, click the 'Print' button.

Using Adobe Acrobat Reader:

  • Access the Print Menu:
    • With the Puzzle Weekly PDF is open in Acrobat Reader, click on the 'File' option in the upper-left corner of the screen.
    • From the drop-down menu, select 'Print' or simply press Command (⌘) + P on your keyboard.
  • Specify Page Range:
    • In the print dialog box, you'll see an option labeled 'Pages to Print'.
    • Select the 'Pages' radio button and then enter the desired page range in the field provided. For example, to print pages 32 to 38, you'd enter 32-38.
  • Print:
    • Confirm the printer, settings, and other preferences.
    • Click on the 'Print' button.

Tips:

  • You can preview your page range before printing to ensure you're printing the right section.
  • Make sure you have the correct printer selected, especially if you’re in an environment or workplace with multiple printers connected or virtual printers installed.
  • To save paper, consider printing double-sided if your printer supports these options.

Android (Mobile Phones)

Printing from a PDF on Android requires using a capable PDF viewer app. For these instructions we’ll use Adobe Acrobat Reader for Android, as it's one of the most widely-used PDF readers available. The steps might vary slightly depending on the version of Android and the app you're using.

Using Adobe Acrobat Reader for Android:

  • Install Adobe Acrobat Reader:
    • If you haven't already, download and install "Adobe Acrobat Reader" from the Google Play Store.
  • Open the Puzzle Weekly PDF File:
    • Launch the Adobe Acrobat Reader app.
    • Navigate to the location of your PDF file within the app and tap on it to open.
  • Access the Print Menu:
    • Once the PDF is open, tap on the three vertical dots (often referred to as the "overflow menu") in the upper-right corner of the screen.
    • From the drop-down menu, select 'Print'.
  • Specify Page Range:
    • Once you're in the print preview screen, you'll see an option for selecting pages (usually represented as 'All pages' by default or a similar phrase).
    • Tap on it and you'll be given an option to specify a range. Enter the desired page numbers. For example, to print pages 32 to 38, you'd enter 32-38.
  • Print:
    • Confirm your printer. This step might vary based on your setup. If you have a wireless printer set up, ensure it's selected. You might also see options for saving as a PDF or printing via cloud services.
    • After confirming your print settings, tap on the 'Print' button.

Tips:

  • Before starting, make sure your Android device is connected to the same network as your wireless printer, if you're using one.
  • Some apps may not offer the ability to select a specific page range. In such cases, consider switching to a different PDF reader app that has this functionality.
  • Keep in mind that not all printers might be compatible with direct printing from Android devices. Ensure your printer supports mobile printing.
  • To save paper, consider printing double-sided if your printer supports these options.

iOS / iPadOS (iPhone and iPad)

Using the built-in PDF viewer or Books app:

  • Open the PDF File:
    • Tap the file Puzzle Weekly file attachment in your email and it will open in the built-in viewer.
  • Access the Print Menu:
    • Tap the screen to reveal the app's interface. Then, tap the share icon (a box with an arrow pointing upward) usually located at the top-right.
    • From the share sheet, select 'Print' or the printer icon.
  • Specify Page Range:
    • You'll see an option labeled 'Range'. Tap on it.
    • Tap the option labeled “Pages x-xx”
    • Choose the range of pages you wish to print. For example, to print pages 32 to 38, you'd select 32 on the first number picker and 38 on the second.
    • Tap the ‘< Options’ label to return to the print dialog.
  • Print:
    • Confirm your printer and the number of copies.
    • Tap 'Print' in the upper-right corner.

Tips:

  • Before starting, ensure your iOS device and your printer are connected to the same Wi-Fi network. If you're using an AirPrint-enabled printer, it should appear automatically in the printer selection.
  • Keep in mind that not all printers might be compatible with AirPrint printing from iOS / iPadOS. Ensure your printer supports AirPrint.
  • To save paper, consider printing double-sided if your printer supports these options.

Number Cross uses a grid of numbers that at first glance might look a bit like a completed Sudoku puzzle. But contrary to Sudoku, Number Cross is a mathematical puzzle.

The goal is to cross out numbers inside the grid so that the remaining numbers in each row and column add up to the numbers outside it. Here's a a small example Number Cross puzzle:

An example of a Number Cross puzzle.

Here’s what that puzzle looks like once it’s been solved:

The solution to the example Number Cross puzzle.

Tips for Solving Number Cross

Start with unique numbers. If a row or column total can only be made by a unique combination of numbers present in the grid, start there.

Look for the smallest and largest totals. Small totals mean more potential numbers that can be immediately crossed out. For example, if the total for a row is ‘2’, then anything larger than ‘2’ can be crossed out in that row. Similarly, very large totals usually require keeping the larger numbers in the grid, thus narrowing down your choices.

Track remaining options. In harder puzzles, for rows or columns where you're unsure of which numbers to cross out, it can help to make a list of possible combinations that add up to the required total. As other parts of the grid get filled in, some of these options will become invalid, leaving you with the answer.

As with all logic puzzles, practicing improves performance. The more puzzles you do, the better you well become at spotting common patterns and at recognising possible combinations.

Where to Play

Want to try your hand at Number Cross? We sometimes include them in our free Puzzle Weekly magazine – you should totally sign up for that if you haven’t already, as it puts 28 brand new puzzles in your inbox every week.

You can also find four levels of Number Cross in our Jumbo Adult Puzzle Book – which happens to include more than 500 puzzles of 20 different varieties.

Puzzle Genius is an imprint of Shelfless.
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